Evander Kane Makes Christmas Memorable for Buffalo Children

The Buffalo Sabres forward recently hosted a holiday dinner in the NHL city he plays in, treating 50 underprivileged children from King Center Charter School to an evening out at an upscale restaurant.

“I hope these kids remember that there are people that care about them and that it shows them the good in this world.”

In the midst of an impressive NHL season, one that has him leading his team in goals (15) and points (33), Evander Kane found the time to make a positive impact off the ice, too.

The Buffalo Sabres forward recently hosted a holiday dinner in the NHL city he plays in, treating 50 underprivileged children from King Center Charter School to an evening out at an upscale restaurant.

At the end of the night, they were surprised with special gifts.

It wasn’t the first time Kane has reached out the less fortunate. Two years ago, in his first season with the Sabres, he treated 50 kids to dinner and then took them on a shopping spree.

In the summer, the Vancouver-born Kane delivered pizza to people in need in his hometown.

While it’s no doubt a big deal to those on the receiving end of the kind deeds, it’s Kane who considers himself the lucky one.

“I just feel it’s important to give back, especially to kids at this time of the year,” said the 26-year-old. “I’m lucky to be in a position to be able to do this and it just has always brought great experiences, not only for the kids but myself as well.”

Kane relished the opportunity to speak with all of the kids he sat down to dinner with on December 20. “The best part of the evening for me was just talking to the kids, getting to know them over the course of the evening and having their personalities come out,” he said. “Their reaction to the gifts at the end of the night was also priceless. It just showed me and everyone who helped put this dinner on how special it was to these kids.”

There’s only only thing he hopes for in return. “I know based on talking to all of them that so many of these kids have such a bright future ahead,” offered Kane, who has skated in 530 regular season NHL games. “Maybe one day they will be doing the same thing that I was able to do and pay it forward.”

At the very least, he wants each and every one of the children to know they aren’t forgotten. “I hope these kids remember that there are people that care about them and that it shows them the good in this world.”